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Having recently lived in Oaxaca for 3 years plus many other visits over time, I’ve scouted out the BEST and highest quality Oaxacan textiles. The following shops are where I hang out and send my fellow textile junkies. Of course, there are LOTS of textiles EVERYWHERE  in Oaxaca, but even if you aren’t a collector, it’s a good idea to educate your eye with the BEST. Honestly, you won’t find anything better than the textiles here!  You’ll most likely be back to buy something as the textiles are that beautiful. I call the following stores —textile DANGER ZONES.

Baules de Juana Cata – Alcala 403  – entrance to ‘Los Danzantes Restuarant’ – inner courtyard to the right. Remigio Mestes’ store is chock full of the most gorgeous textiles in all Oaxaca. The last 15 years Remigio has been instrumental is revitalizing traditional back-strap weaving and natural dyeing, not to mention embroidery and use of finer base materials.  He has encouraged over 200 artisans (see picture) to create the most refined and elegant textiles probably in all of Mexico. To talk to Remigio you have to have luck and timing as he’s often out of town visiting his artisans or out of the country or traveling searching for better base materials (silks & cottons) or setting up exhibits in places like Japan. If your timing is right the best time to catch him is around 7 pm in his shop. If you are seriously interested in seeing (and possibly buying) the VERY best he will be happy to pull things out of his ‘baules’ / trunks that will knock your socks off!  He also has a very knowledgeable staff who look young but are very charming and capable of assisting you. He’s training the children of his artisans to be merchants and ambassadors of their traditional textile culture.

Museo Textile de OaxacaHidalgo 917 corner of Fiallo – two block east of the Zocalo –  The museum shop at Museo Textile de Oaxaca offers top quality textiles from Oaxaca and other parts of Mexico. GREAT stuff. The Museum itself  has an outstanding collection of Mexican textiles but seeing it will depend on what is currently showing. You might get lucky and be there for the monthly 3-4 day sales/demonstrations by visiting regional artisans, which is a great opportunity to buy directly from the artists. Please check the following link to see what’s going on. The museum also offers short classes in indigo dyeing, back-strap loom weaving, embroidery and other things textile related. Current classes will be listed on the site too.

Arte Amuzgo5 da May #217B- one block down from Camino Real Convent Hotel on the right. Odilon Morales, represents his weavers coop from San Pedro Amuzgos,and indigenous villages near the coast of Oaxaca. (see a little sign painted on the wall outside of his shop of a weaver at her back strap loom). Odilon is another innovative organizer/promoter of traditional weavers who provides the high quality threads and encourages contemporary color combinations. His weavers produce refined sophisticated huipiles and blouses sought after by affluent Mexicans and foreign collectors. High quality textiles from other weaving groups in the Oaxacan coastal area available too. Both Odilon and Remigio have been participants in the prestigious Santa Fe International Folk Art Market – so my best images of them are from this event.

COMING SOON  – PART II AND III – Textile Shopping in and around Oaxaca and Individual Artisan Shops….

 

I’ve been a bit tardy with my posts in 2013 and now March 2014 is here!

Collecting Mexican Textiles Presentation – March 13th – 2013 – Louisville, COLORADO

If you live near Denver/Boulder Colorado and want to learn more about collecting traditional Mexican Textiles and the excitement of finding beautiful clothing and textiles in Mexico …. you are cordially invited to Laura Lambrecht’s charming store BELLA FRIDA – on 924 Main Street, Louisville, Colorado. Come early and try on beautiful huipiles from Chiapas and Oaxaca as well as learn how to tie a REBOZO – the signature Mexican accessory shawl.

Trunk show opens at 6:30pm and the slide presentation around 7:15pm.

(720) 301-1645 – event questions

VIVA LA FRIDA – VIVA LA VIDA – VIVA LOS TEXTILES DE MEXICO!!!

Aguatenango's huipi - Chiapas

Aguatenango’s huipi – Chiapas

Tehuana Women , Gala Outfits,  Isthmus of Oaxaca

Tehuana Women , Gala Outfits, Isthmus of Oaxaca

Amuzgo weaver - Florentina Lopez - Oaxaca

Amuzgo weaver – Florentina Lopez – Oaxaca

I became a Lila Downs fan when she performed in Santa Fe, NM perhaps over 12 years ago. At that time her fashion sense was pretty much ‘Dead Head’ exotic-hippie-Mexicana. I loved her long ribbon braids and pieces of traditional  heavily embroidered Tehuana skirt fabric that she somehow managed to keep on her hips during her dynamic songs. Well, things have changed, baby – and now she has a designer  (Mane’ Alta Costura of Oaxaca) making her still-indigenous based costumes, to my great joy, from traditional traje /regional clothing and textiles of Mexico.  Since I’m a collector/documenter of Mexican traditional textiles, I certainly recognize the original pieces. But how they’ve been transformed!  All I can say is , WOW! ! !.  I’ve been collecting images of some of her most original uses of these beautifully woven or embroidered textiles and the creative ways they’ve been reconstructed into lavish and sometimes ‘over the top’ creations.

I hope you enjoy this slide show (many of the images are from past performances featured on Lila’s FB pages) and for those interested in “Living Textiles of Mexico”, I’ve identified the original village or region, where her textiles are from. After all, Lila’s mother is from Tlaxiaco in the Mixteca area of Oaxaca and Lila spent part of her childhood there, and currently spends part of the year in Oaxaca, living, performing and doing philanthropic work by supporting education for young rural indigenous girls. She knows  the traditional origins of her clothing, most are from Oaxaca her home, and she’s proud of it!  They are the very best of the best Oaxacan traje ! 

VIVA LILA – Fashionista Mexicana!  VIVA the traditional trajes of Oaxaca!

Here’s a YouTube vido I just made for this post – and my favorite song – ‘La Cumbia del Mole’

http://youtu.be/4bDmM8rN4n4

upcycled Tijaltepec  Blouse Oax - Lila's FBZapotec apron - Lila's FB

Returning to Chiapas after two years, a NEW world class textile museum was waiting to be explored. The Centro de Textiles del Mundo Maya is located in the Convento Santo Domingo in San Cristobal de las Casas, which underwent extensive renovations to accommodate Guatemalan textiles from Formento Cultural Banamex Collection and the Pellizzi Collection of Chiapan textiles. Excellent state of the art lighting, displays and investigative opportunities await the visitor. Signs are in English and Spanish and many of the textiles are from the 1970’s – 80’s considered a renaissance period for Mayan textiles. As a collector I certainly was happy to see excellent examples of ceremonial garments from Chiapas, Guatemala and three perfect cross-stich embroidered huipiles from Yucatan. These are included in the following slide show. If you are ‘doing textiles in Chiapas’,  don’t miss this museum as well as the Sergio Castro Collection – open evenings by appointment and explored in a past post.

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Sergio CastroSergio Castro of San Cristobal, Chiapas has a world class collection of  textiles (which I covered in a previous post). Many tourists and locals have experienced his lectures, learned about the different traditional Mayan groups living in the highlands of Chiapas and viewed the beautiful ‘trajes’ displayed at his museum.

An important short film El Andalon/The Healer (available free on-line for a short time) shows the life of this dedicated humanitarian and the work he does for the communities in the San Cristobal area. This is a truly inspiring story….and if you love Chiapas, one you will enjoy.

Please watch if you want to learn more about Sergio and how his Textile Collection and museum is part of his legacy and continuing humanitarian work.

http://www.cultureunplugged.com/documentary/watch-online/play/8957/El-Andalon–The-Healer-

Sergio's Costume

 more costumes

This is the time of year when we’re looking for that ‘special’ item for that ‘special’ person. If you’re like me, while I’m looking for gifts, I usually find a few for myself!  Not necessarily a bad thing, it’s the thrill of treasure hunt, until one day you realize that your storage area is STUFFED full of treasures that need new homes.

My Etsy shop LIVING TEXTILES – (click here) – has really gotten going this last year – so many of my Mexico textile finds and parts of my personal collection has moved on (even a large group of huipiles going to Kuwait last month). Now my ethnic jewels are happily running off to new owners. Here a flashy Chiapa de Corzo, Chiapas, skirt to wear to a Holiday party – you’ll be noticed!

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Please also check out my second Etsy shop LUCITAS BODEGA (click here) for many ethnographic items from my years collecting/buying devotional art in Ecuador and Mexico plus truly decorative collectors items from OLD Mexico. Once a collector there is no choice but to become a dealer/vendor to keep the momentum. So bear with me – my son is worried about my collection becoming HIS collection. I suggested he could open a store called ‘Dead Mom’s Stuff’ – but that’s a bit tacky. Probably better to sell it now on Etsy!

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You’ll find some truly interesting things in my stores – ’tis the time of year to GO SHOPPING – as if you really needed to hear that!

An article was published this week, OCT. 10th., in Hand/Eye Magazine, an on-line e-zine – connecting cultures and inspiring action – covering  ‘Living Textiles of Mexico’ and my work documenting indigenous textiles in Mexico. Annie Waterman did an e-interview asking some very poignant questions. The article was woven nicely and coherently with my responses and if you are curious about  ‘what exactly does she do?’ – you’ll enjoy it.

Here’s the link:

http://handeyemagazine.com/content/documenting-lives-textiles

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